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All Souls Indianapolis

Sermons of All Souls Unitarian Church in Indianapolis, Indiana by minister Anastassia Zinke and guest speakers.
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Now displaying: September, 2017
Sep 17, 2017

Yum Kipper is probably the most important of Judaism’s high holy days, the culmination of the Days of Awe, that begins with Rosh Hashanah. "Yom Kippur" means "Day of Atonement." It is a day set aside to "afflict the soul," to atone for the sins of the past year when one has acted against one’s understanding of the holy and has transgressed against other people. Atonement can be broken down into: At-one-ment, implying that when we forgive and are forgiven, we are brought back into relationship with one another. Let us come together to reflect on how we can reach for reconnection and forgiveness. 

All Souls Unitarian Church, Indianapolis, IN.

Sep 10, 2017

Many who have been hurt or harmed struggle with the question of whether to forgive, and why or why not to do so. The decision is personal, but it can also be ethical. Could forgiving be perceived as condoning? Is the act of forgiveness for the benefit of the other or oneself? Let us explore these questions together, and how forgiveness can also be ethically bounded and liberating.

Rev. Zinke Preaching.

All Souls Unitarian Church, Indianapolis, IN

Sep 3, 2017
On this Labor Day weekend, Fran Quigley will lead us in reflecting about how we can mitigate income and wealth disparity not just in our communities but also in our own workplaces. The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. held that a more equal sharing of our wealth is a necessary foundation for a beloved community. That journey toward economic justice will necessarily include healthy doses of forgiveness, including the self-forgiveness that will allow those of us with comparatively comfortable economic situations to move away from avoidance or ineffectual “liberal guilt” to direct engagement in inequality allaround us.
 
Fran Quigley is a clinical professor of law at the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law, teaching in the Health and Human Rights Clinic. Students in the Health and Human Rights Clinic advocate for the rights of the poor, with a special focus on individual and systemic barriers to accessing healthcare and the social determinants of health 
 
All Souls Unitarian Church, Indianapolis, IN
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